University of Evansville

Schroeder School of Business

In recent years, 98 percent of Schroeder School of Business graduates have been employed within six months of graduation.

Course Offerings

ACCT–150 Introductory Accounting Lab (1 credit)
Computerized business simulation dealing with the procedural details of financial accounting. Covers analyzing and recording transactions through the preparation of financial statements presented in a corporate approach.
ACCT–210 Principles of Accounting I (3 credits)
Study of the internal and external uses and users of accounting information,including the roles of managers, owners, and creditors. Covers accounting issues involving income and cash flows.
ACCT–211 Principles of Accounting II (3 credits)
A continuation of Accounting 210 with additional emphasis on the measurement and interpretation of accounting information and its use in appraising past, controlling present,and planning future business operations. Includes accounting for manufacturing companies. Prerequisite: Accounting 210.
ACCT–310 Intermediate Accounting I (3 credits)
Stresses basic theory and alternative approaches to income determination and asset valuation. Includes study of basic financial statements, the accounting cycle, cash, receivables, inventory, property, plant and equipment, intangibles, and liabilities. Prerequisites: Accounting 150, 210. (Accounting 150 and 310 may be taken concurrently.) Fall.
ACCT–311 Intermediate Accounting II (3 credits)
Examines problems in accounting for stockholders' equity, investment,revenue recognition, income taxes, pensions, and leases. In-depth study of accounting changes and error analysis, statement of cash flows, financial statement analysis, disclosure requirements, and changing prices. Prerequisite: Accounting 310. Spring.
ACCT–317 Cost Accounting (3 credits)
Examines issues and procedures in product costing for financial statement purposes under both historical and standard costing. Includes budgeting, variance analysis, and other advanced topics. Prerequisite: Accounting 211. Fall.
ACCT–321 Accounting Information Systems (3 credits)
Focuses on the role of the system of data collection and processing in accounting-management reporting for business and industry. Includes design factors, internal controls, and implementation issues. Student gains knowledge of basic techniques in application of accounting computer software. Prerequisites: Accounting 150, 211. Credit not given for both Accounting 321 and Management 311. Spring.
ACCT–329 Federal Income Tax I (3 credits)
Studies current federal income tax law concepts of income and deductions for all entities. Prerequisite: Accounting 210. Fall.
ACCT–330 Federal Income Tax II (3 credits)
Studies other current federal income tax law concepts not included in Accounting 329 for all entities. Concepts relating to partnerships, corporations, trusts, and estates are also examined. Prerequisite: Accounting 329. Spring.
ACCT–347 International Accounting (3 credits)
Introduces and examines accounting for transactions in a global economy. Course dedicated to an overview of the convergence of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles with International Accounting Standards. Specific topics include financial disclosure, foreign exchange, taxation,and ethics. Prerequisite: Accounting 310. Offered periodically.
ACCT–360 Computer Accounting (3 credits)
This course introduces students to popular accounting software applications used by millions of small and medium-size organizations around the world. Students will learn to use the software processes and procedures to prepare reports related to the accounting cycle, general ledger, accounts payable, accounts receivable, payroll and inventory system to generate a wide variety of business and financial reports. The accounting software packages introduced in this course are currently being used by regional accounting firms and some Fortune 500 companies.
ACCT–380 Special Topics in Accounting (3 credits)
Covers topics not included in other courses, gives greater depth in certain areas, and explores current accounting topics. Topic varies each offering. Prerequisite: Accounting 211. Offered periodically.
ACCT–395 Independent Study (1-3 credits)
Independent research in accounting conducted under faculty supervision.Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ACCT–398 Internship in Accounting (3 credits)
First internship; a structured assignment that allows student to gain practical experience in an accounting position relating to an area of career interest. Student is directed by the internship director and supervised by a member of the cooperating organization. Enrollment in course must be concurrent with work experience. A contract (available from the business school's internship director) must be approved and an offer letter from the internship provider must be on file before registering for course. Sponsoring institutions may require students to have completed specific courses(s) in addition to the following prerequisites prior to beginning the internship. Writing intensive course. Prerequisites: Accounting 310; Experiential Education 90; permission of the internship director of the Schroeder Family School of Business Administration.
ACCT–414 Auditing (3 credits)
Student develops an understanding of the auditing profession and its relationship to the financial community. Includes an examination of professional ethics, legal liability, auditing standards,and procedures, reporting and statistics. Prerequisite: Accounting 310. Fall.
ACCT–420 Advanced Accounting (3 credits)
Studies the theory and techniques of accounting and reporting for business combinations, consolidated financial statements, partnerships, and fund accounting. Prerequisite: Accounting 310. Offered periodically.
ACCT–430 Advanced Managerial Accounting (3 credits)
Studies the application of management accounting to strategy and the impact of new and evolving management thinking. Topics include cost allocations, sales variances, management control systems, transfer pricing, performance evaluation, and compensation systems. Prerequisite: Accounting 317. Offered periodically.
ACCT–445 Database Management (3 credits)
Introduces basic database topics, including data modeling, entity relationship diagramming, database normalization, and proper database design. Advanced topics including structured query language, transaction management, and concurrency control covered on a limited basis to demonstrate the challenges organizations face when implementing multi-user databases. Accounting related projects apply course topics to give an idea of how databases are used in accounting systems of business organizations. Prerequisite: Accounting 321. Same as Management 445. Offered alternate fall semesters.
ACCT–498 Internship in Accounting (3 credits)
Second internship; a structured assignment that allows the student to gain practical experience in an accounting position relating to an area of career interest. Must be a distinct work experience from that provided by Accounting 398. Credits earned apply only as free elective credits. Studentis directed by the internship director and supervised by a member of the cooperating organization. Enrollment in course must be concurrent with work experience. A contract (available from the business school's internship director) must be approved and an offer letter from the internship provider must be on file before registering for course. Sponsoring institutions may require students to have completed specific course(s) in addition to the following prerequisites prior to beginning the internship. Writing intensive course. Prerequisites: Accounting 398; permission of the internship director of the Schroeder Family School of Business Administration.
BUS–265 Contemporary European Business Issues (3 credits)
Strategic business concepts in the context of the European Union. Multidisciplinary approach to issues related to the European Monetary Union, global challenges facing European business, and comparative business and leadership experiences. Students participate in site visits in the United Kingdom to develop understanding of operations of corporations from a global perspective. Exposure to historical and cultural context of European business to enhance business decision-making skills. Conducted at Harlaxton College. Open to majors in accounting, business administration, and economics. Prerequisite: Economics 102 or Interdisciplinary 150.
BUS–269 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship (3 credits)
Introduces the topic of entrepreneurship in a classroom setting. Includes overview of entrepreneurial processes and traits, developing and managing the challenges of operating a new venture, and successful exit strategies. Focuses on development of a business plan for a new venture by student teams. Enrollment limited to students majoring in business or accounting. Credit for Business 269 is contingent upon subsequent completion of Business 270. Corequisite: Accounting 210.
BUS–269L Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship Lab
Introduces the topic of entrepreneurship in a classroom setting. Includes overview of entrepreneurial processes and traits, developing and managing the challenges of operating a new venture, and successful exit strategies. Focuses on development of a business plan for a new venture by student teams. Enrollment limited to students majoring in business or accounting. Credit for Business 269 is contingent upon subsequent completion of Business 270. Corequisite: Accounting 210.
BUS–270 Experience in Entrepreneurship (3 credits)
Applied experience in entrepreneurship. Under supervision of a faculty member, student teams initiate and run a new business venture based on the business plan that was reviewed and approved in Business 269. Enrollment limited to students majoring in business or accounting. Upon successful completion of Business 270, credit will be awarded for both Business 269 and 270. Prerequisite: Business 269.
BUS–270L Experience in Entrepreneurship
Applied experience in entrepreneurship. Under supervision of a faculty member, student teams initiate and run a new business venture based on the business plan that was reviewed and approved in Business 269. Enrollment limited to students majoring in business or acco1unting. Upon successful completion of Business 270, credit will be awarded for both Business 269 and 270. Prerequisite: Business 269.
BUS–350 Global Assistance Project (3 credits)
An introduction to project management and consulting, this course covers basic project scoping, timeline development, proposal writing, and presentation of strategic recommendations to clients. This is an experiential learning opportunity, in which students are assigned to project teams that complete real-world consulting projects for active business organizations. Prerequisite: Management 377, Marketing 325, or Finance 361
BUS–365 Contemporary European Business Issues (3 credits)
Strategic business concepts in the context of the European Union. Multidisciplinary approach to issues related to the European Monetary Union, global challenges facing European business, and comparative business and leadership experiences. Students participate in site visits in the United Kingdom to develop understanding of operations of corporations from a global perspective. Exposure to historical and cultural context of European business to enhance business decision-making skills. Conducted at Harlaxton College. Open to majors in accounting, business administration, or economics. Prerequisite: Interdisciplinary 150 or Economics 102.
BUS–380 Special Topics in Business (3 credits)
Covers topics not included in other courses to give greater depth in certain areas and to explore current topics. Topic varies each offering. Prerequisite: Interdisciplinary 150. Offered periodically.
BUS–398 Internship in Business (3 credits)
First internship; a structured assignment in which student gains practical experience in a business position related to an area of career interest. Student is directed by the internship director and supervised by a member of the cooperating organization. A contract (available from the business school?s internship director) must be approved and an offer letter from the internship provider must be on file before registering for course. Sponsoring institutions may require students to have completed specific courses(s) in addition to the following prerequisites prior to beginning the internship. Prerequisites: Experiential Education 90; at least one of Finance 361, Management 311, Management 377, or Marketing 325; permission of the internship director of the Schroeder Family School of Business Administration.
BUS–400 ACES Passport Program
The ACES Passport Program provides a roadmap for students to develop career advancement techniques and network contacts. All students are required to establish an alumni/career mentor, attend career fairs, and take the EXED 090 course and complete BUS 398. Students are also required to select other professional development activities, including but not limited to, joining a business club, attending career advancement speaker events, networking, and Employer in the Foyer events, conducting mock interviews, and engaging with employers at company information sessions. Activities will be approved and documented by the Schroeder Family School of Business Administration Career Advancement office. Enrollment limited to students majoring in business or accounting.
BUS–498 Internship in Business (3 credits)
Second internship; a structured assignment in which student gains practical experience in a business position related to an area of career interest. Must be a distinct work experience from that provided by Accounting 398 or Business 398. Credits earned apply only as free elective credits. Student is directed by the internship director and supervised by a member of the cooperating organization. Enrollment in course must be concurrent with the work experience. A contract (available from the business school's internship director) must be approved and an offer letter from the internship provider must be on file before registering for the course. Sponsoring institutions may require students to have completed specific course(s) in addition to the following prerequisites prior to beginning the internship. Prerequisites: Accounting 398 or Business 398; permission of the internship director of the Schroeder Family School of Business Administration.
ECON–101 Principles of Macroeconomics (3 credits)
Macroeconomics is the branch of economics that studies the domestic economic system as a whole and its interaction with foreign economies. This course focuses on the behavior of the aggregate economy as it pertains to the determination of national income, production, level of employment, general price level, and trace flows. Particular attention is devoted to fiscal policy and monetary policy and their respective impact on the economic system. Satisfies a general education requirement in human behavior and society.
ECON–102 Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits)
Markets are among the oldest social institutions known to man. Microeconomics is a branch of economics that studies the dynamics of individual markets and prices. Focuses on the behavior of producers and consumers and the interdependence in the market process. Pays particular attention to the structure and evolution of competitive markets. Satisfies a general education requirement in human behavior and society. Economics 101 is not a prerequisite.
ECON–300 Regression Analysis (3 credits)
Second course in applied statistics for students in economics and other social sciences, business administration, mathematics, or natural sciences. Topics include simple and multiple regression analysis, extensions of the classical regression model, and problems associated with forecasting. Assigned work exposes students to problems from a wide range of applications. This course includes introduction to econometric software and experiments involving a variety of real world data sets. Prerequisite: Quantitative Methods 227 or another course in principles of statistics. Offered alternate fall semesters.
ECON–345 Intermediate Microeconomics (3 credits)
Microeconomics provides the foundation for logical and disciplined reasoning in virtually every aspect of economics. A rigorous introduction to the behavior of buyers and producers and their interaction in the market, course covers theories of rational choice, principles of production, and the economic costs of production. Attention devoted to the nature of competitive and monopoly markets and to markets for factors of production. In each area, emphasizes the principles of economic efficiency and the concept of economic welfare. Prerequisites: Economics 102; Mathematics 134 or higher. Offered alternate years.
ECON–346 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3 credits)
Macroeconomics is the study of the economy as a whole. Course analyzes the factors determining the growth in income, changes in prices, and the rate of unemployment. As appropriate, the course makes use of models suited to the long run and the short run and models of both open and closed economies. Prerequisites: Economics 101, 102. Offered alternate years.
ECON–372 Money and Banking (3 credits)
Monetary economics examines the effect of money on economic outcomes. The course focuses on the theory and applications of monetary economics with emphasis on how money supply and interest rates are controlled in practice. Discussion topics include the role of interest rates in the economy and their determination in financial markets, operating goals and procedures of the Federal Reserve in its implementation of monetary policy, and alternative theories regarding the determination of aggregate output, employment, and prices. Prerequisites: Economics 101, 102. Same as Finance 372. Offered alternate years.
ECON–380 Special Topics in Economics (3 credits)
Covers topics not included in other courses, to give greater depth in certain areas and to explore current economic topics. Topic varies each offering. Prerequisites: Economics 101, 102. Offered periodically.
ECON–381 Economics of Public Policy (3 credits)
Uses the normative standards of efficiency, equity, and freedom to evaluate various public policies. Policies discussed include policies on agriculture, housing, the environment, market power, income distribution, taxation, and economic growth. Prerequisites: Economics 101, 102. Offered alternate years.
ECON–395 Independent Study (1-3 credits)
Independent research in economics conducted under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ECON–400 Econometrics (3 credits)
Continuation of Economics 300. An introductory treatment of econometric techniques and their application to business and social science research. Topics include general linear regression models, nonlinear regression, simultaneous equation models, and models with limited dependent variables. Based on a series of experiments using real world data sets. Prerequisite: Economics 300. Offered alternate spring semesters.
ECON–425 International Trade (3 credits)
Analyzes theories and empirical foundations of international trade and factor movement, trade barriers, international monetary relations, foreign exchange systems, balance of payments, and current international economic problems. Prerequisites: Economics 101, 102. Offered alternate years.
ECON–435 International Monetary Economics (3 credits)
This course focuses on the theory of international monetary economics and applies it towards gaining an understanding of current developments and policy issues. The discussion topics on the theory side include the national income accounting, the foreign exchange markets and exchange rate determination, the effect of money and inflation on interest rates and exchange rates, the effect of exchange rates on aggregate demand and output, the choice of the exchange rate regime, and the effect of monetary and fiscal policy on employment and output in an open economy under flexible and fixed exchange rate regimes. The insights gained from the theoretical discussion will help discuss various topics such as the US current account deficit, the impact of the Chinese exchange rate policy on its trade partners, the role of monetary and fiscal policy coordination in the aftermath of the global financial crisis. Prequisites: ECON-101, ECON-102.
ECON–470 Development of Economic Thought (3 credits)
Surveys the range of economic ideas from ancient times to the present. As in other seminars, the student is responsible for substantial research and presentation of his or her ideas. Prerequisites: Economics 101, 102. Offered alternate years. (Some students will complete this senior seminar requirement during their junior year.)
FIN–280 Introduction to Personal Finance (3 credits)
Covers information that allows students to begin their working careers well informed of their financial responsibilities. Covers the fundamentals of personal finance and emphasizes the life cycle approach to personal financial planning. Primary goals of course are (a) make participants aware of need to plan their financial future and (b) increase their knowledge of the various aspects of personal finance in order to plan their financial future effectively. Major topics are managing assets, credit and insurance, investments, and retirement planning. Helps participants begin lifelong journey toward financial literacy. Offered periodically.
FIN–361 Fundamentals of Finance (3 credits)
Introduces core principles of time value of money, risk return analysis, financial forecasting, and security valuation. Analyzes foundations of capital budgeting techniques, cash flow estimation, taxation, and depreciation methods. Prerequisites: Accounting 210; Economics 102; or permission of instructor.
FIN–362 Corporate Financial Policy (3 credits)
Examines the capital budgeting, financing, dividend policy, and working capital decisions of value-maximizing firms with use of case studies. Prerequisite: Finance 361. Spring.
FIN–372 Money and Banking (3 credits)
Monetary economics examines the effect of money on economic outcomes. The course focuses on the theory and applications of monetary economics with emphasis on how money supply and interest rates are controlled in practice. Discussion topics include the role of interest rates in the economy and their determination in financial markets, operating goals and procedures of the Federal Reserve in its implementation of monetary policy, and alternative theories regarding the determination of aggregate output, employment, and prices. Prerequisites: Economics 101, 102. Same as Economics 372. Offered alternate years.
FIN–380 Special Topics in Finance (3 credits)
Covers topics not included in other courses, provides in-depth understanding of selected areas in finance, and explores relevant current topics. Theme varies each offering. Prerequisite: Finance 361. Offered periodically.
FIN–395 Independent Study (1-3 credits)
Independent research in finance conducted under faculty supervision.Prerequisites: Finance 361, permission of instructor.
FIN–426 International Financial Management (3 credits)
Analyzes foreign exchange, currency futures, and options markets. Examines aspects of international banking, bond, and equity markets from the perspective of multinational corporations and institutions. Prerequisite: Finance 361. Same as Economics 426.
FIN–427 Financial Derivatives & Alt Investments (3 credits)
The course introduces financial derivatives and their applications. Topics include features of primary financial derivatives (forwards, futures, swaps, and options), the basics of derivatives analysis, and the structure of their markets. The course also covers some advanced topics in investment strategies and risk management; includes discussion of alternative investments and investing in commodities.
FIN–462 Investments (3 credits)
Develops the principles governing investment of personal funds based on modern capital market theory. Common stocks, bonds, options, and futures contracts analyzed. Prerequisite: Finance 361.
FIN–470 Financial Institutions/Markets (3 credits)
The operation and management of financial institutions and the markets in which they operate discussed. Managerial and public policy issues toward financial institutions and markets also addressed. Prerequisite: Finance 361. Offered alternate years.
FIN–478 Risk Management (3 credits)
Examines the principles and terminologies of insurance. Analyzes variety of insurance contracts and risk management plans. Discusses the public policy issues related to the insurance industry. Prerequisite: Finance 361. Offered periodically.
FIN–482 Financial Planning: Process/Environment (3 credits)
Financial planning principles, areas, application, process, effective communication, risk evaluations, ethics and practice standards, financial planning problem solving, regulations, financial institutions. Prerequisite: Finance 361. Offered periodically.
MGT–231 Survey Global Business (3 credits)
Explores the challenges facing global business. Topics include international perspectives on business structure, cultural en ironment, ethics, finance,legal systems, management, marketing and production.
MGT–280 Special Topics in Management (3 credits)
Covers topics not included in other courses, gives greater depth in certain areas and explores current management topics. Topic varies each offering.
MGT–300 Principles of Management (3 credits)
Analyzes functions of management: planning, organizing, staffing,directing and controlling. Examines evolution from scientific management to contingency/systems management by presenting the functions of management, their purposes, activities and interactions. Prerequisite:Satisfaction of the School of Business Administration leveling policy. Credit not given for both Management 300 and Management 377.
MGT–306 Human Resources (3 credits)
Covers the basic components of the human resource management (HRM) function in organizations, including hiring employees, assessing performance, and administering pay and benefits. All these activities msut be performed in compliance with the law, so course also addresses Equal Employment Opportunity laws and other federal legislation and agencies that impact HRM. Prerequisite: Satisfaction of leveling policy. Fall.
MGT–310 Production/Operations Management (3 credits)
Survey of the management problems found in the manufacturing of goods and the delivery of services. Various issues considered with emphasis on quantitative models available for solving selected problems. Total quality management and other management concepts discussed. Prerequisite: Quantitative Methods 227 or equivalent statistics course.
MGT–311 Management Information Systems (3 credits)
A study of various types of computer-based information systems including their design, acquisition and operation from the perspective of the manager/end-user. Prerequisites: Accounting 211, Software Application 110. Credit not given for both Management 311 and Accounting 321.
MGT–331 International Business Strategy (3 credits)
Examination of the challenges of conducting business outside the firm's country of origin. Explores the unique aspects of international business, the international environment, and foreign environmental forces from a strategic perspective. Prerequisite: Economics 101 or 102.
MGT–377 Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
Focuses on developing an understanding of the individual and group level factors that influence employee attitudes and behavior at work. Emphasis placed on learning organizational behavior theories, their empirical validity and their practical implications. Topics include personality and emotions, motivation, work teams and leadership.Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the School of Business Administration course level policy. Credit not given for both Management 377 and Management 300.
MGT–380 Special Topics in Management (3 credits)
Covers topics not included in other courses, gives greater depth in certain areas and explores current management topics. Topic varies each offering. Prerequisite: Management 300 or 377. Offered periodically.
MGT–395 Independent Study (1-3 credits)
Independent research in management conducted under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
MGT–402 Compensation and Benefits (3 credits)
Effective pay systems stimulate future performance, reward past performance, provide an adequate standard of living and are perceived to be internally and externally fair. Job evaluation, wage and salary surveys and performance evaluation programs try to achieve these for wages and salary pay plans, incentive pay plans and an array of benefit plans including health and life insurance, pensions, safety and accident prevention plans, etc. Prerequisite: Management 306. Spring.
MGT–412 Leadership (3 credits)
Experience individual, team and organizational level behaviors, teamwork and group dynamics, and communication processes in organizational leadership through the study of leadership theories, experiential exercises and case study. Prerequisite: Management 300 or 377.
MGT–430 Decision Making (3 credits)
Develops a theoretical and practical understanding of individual and multiparty decision-making processes. Emphasis placed on learning about the systematic ways in which people's judgments deviate from what a rational model would predict. Coverage of multiparty decision making includes an extensive treatment of negotiation strategies. Applications to the management context and recommendations for improving decision making are highlighted. Prerequisite: Management 300 or 377.
MGT–445 Database Management (3 credits)
Introduces basic database topics including data modeling, entity relationship diagramming, database normalization, and proper database design. Advanced topics (including structured query language, transaction management, and concurrency control) covered on a limited basis to demonstrate the challenges organizations face when implementing multi-user databases. Business related topics including data warehouse and electronic commerce covered to give an idea of how databases are used in modern business organizations. Prerequisite: Management 311. Same as Accounting 445, Management Information Systems 445, Information Technology 445. Offered alternate years.
MGT–450 Knowledge Management (3 credits)
Broad, cross-disciplinary field that encompasses cognitive science, expert systems, artificial intelligence, groupware, document management, decision support systems, databases, and organizational behavior. Knowledge management defined as performing the activities involved in discovering, capturing, sharing, and applying knowledge so as to enhance, in a cost-effective manner, the impact of knowledge on the organization's goals. Prerequisite: Accounting 321 or Management 311. Same as Management Information Systems 450. Offered alternate years.
MGT–455 Global Supply Chain Issues in Manufactur (3 credits)
Offers key issues and approaches to global supply chain management, including product and supply chain design, customer value management, inventory management, supply chain integration, strategic alliances, and information technology. Prerequisite: Management 310. Offered alternate years.
MGT–497 Global Strategic Management (3 credits)
Uses a strategic planning model to integrate principles and techniques learned in accounting, economics, finance, marketing, management and quantitative methods. Examines strategies used to attain and maintain a global competitive advantage. Writing intensive course. Prerequisites: Management 377, Marketing 325, Finance 361 and senior standing. Senior seminar course.
MGT–H250 Seminar in Contemporary Leadership (3 credits)
Explores various theories of leadership and ethical behavior through the use of ases based on classic and modern firms. Covers topics including conflict resolution, situational leadership, diversity, authority, power, and organizational culture. Harlaxton summer course only. Offered periodically.
MIS–350 Fund Programming I (3 credits)
Emphasizes problem-solving techniques used in the analysis and design of software solutions, including structured top-down design, abstraction, good programming style, debugging, and testing. Programming constructs covered include control structures, functions, and basic, aggregate, and user-defined data types. Introduction to object-oriented design and recursion. Same as Computer Science 210. Fall, spring
MIS–355 Fund Programming II (3 credits)
Project and problem-solving course emphasizes the use of classes for encapsulation of abstract data types and abstract data structures. Topics include classes, templates, dynamic allocation, searching and sorting, recursion, and exception handling. Prerequisite: Management Information Systems 350. Same as Computer Science 215. Fall, spring.
MIS–445 Database Management (3 credits)
Introduces basic database topics including data modeling, entity relationship diagramming, database normalization, and proper database design. Advanced topics (including structured query language, transaction management, and concurrency control) covered on a limited basis to demonstrate the challenges organizations face when implementing multi-user databases. Business related topics including data warehouse and electronic commerce covered to give an idea of how databases are used in modern business organizations. Prerequisite: Accounting 321 or Management 311. Same as Accounting 445, Management 445, Information Technology 445. Offered periodically.
MIS–450 Knowledge Management (3 credits)
Broad, cross-disciplinary field that encompasses cognitive science, expert systems, artificial intelligence, groupware, document management, decision support systems, databases, and organizational behavior. Knowledge management defined as performing the activities involved in discovering, capturing, sharing, and applying knowledge so as to enhance, in a cost-effective manner, the impact of knowledge on the organization's goals. Prerequisite: Accounting 321 or Management 311. Same as Management 450. Offered alternate years.
MKT–225 Fundamentals of Marketing (3 credits)
Introduction to basic marketing principles from the perspective of a marketing manager. Topics covered include the marketing concept, product analysis, consumer behavior, channels of distribution, pricing, promotion, international marketing and marketing's role in society. Prerequisite:Economics 101 or 102 or permission of the instructor.
MKT–300 Regression Analysis (3 credits)
Second course in applied statistics for students in economics and other social sciences, business administration, mathematics, or natural sciences. Topics include simple and multiple regression analysis, extensions of the classical regression model, and problems associated with forecasting. Assigned work exposes students to problems from a wide range of applications. This course includes introduction to econometric software and experiments involving a variety of real world data sets.
MKT–325 Principles of Marketing (3 credits)
Introduction to basic marketing principles from the perspective of a marketing manager. Topics covered include the marketing concept, product analysis, consumer behavior, channels of distribution, pricing, promotion, international marketing and marketing's role in society. Prerequisite: Satisfaction of leveling policy.
MKT–330 Consumer Behavior (3 credits)
Consumer behavior studied from socio-economic, psychological and cultural perspectives as it relates to marketing management.Prerequisite: Marketing 325. Spring.
MKT–373 Personal Selling (3 credits)
Studies the responsibilities,activities and psychology of a sales representative with a focus on long-term relationship building. Successful selling practices are introduced including prospecting, establishing rapport, generating curiosity,being persuasive, creating desire, handling objections and closing. Prerequisite: Marketing 325.
MKT–374 Integrated Marketing Communication (3 credits)
Provides an examination of all elements of the marketing promotion mix - advertising, sales promotions, pointof- purchase communication, direct marketing communication, public relations and sponsorship marketing, and personal selling. Overview of market segmentation, appeals, budgets, evaluation and management of the promotion mix. Prerequisite: Marketing 325.
MKT–380 Special Topics in Marketing (3 credits)
Covers topics not included in other courses. Gives greater depth in certain areas and explores current marketing topics.Topic varies each offering. Prerequisite: Marketing 325.Offered periodically.
MKT–381 Special Topics in Marketing (3 credits)
Covers topics not included in other courses,gives greater depth in certain areas and explores current marketing topics.
MKT–385 Digital Marketing (3 credits)
This course examines timely concerns at the intersection of marketing and technology. Topics include internet technology for marketers, online privacy and security issues, buyer behavior online, and digital marketing techniques such as banner advertising, advertising and participating in social media, search engine optimization, and mobile and email marketing.
MKT–395 Independent Study (1-3 credits)
Independent research in marketing conducted under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Marketing 325; permission of the instructor.
MKT–473 Int'l Sales & Logistics (3 credits)
This hands-on course is designed to prepare students for International Trade. By exporting and importing products to and from an international education partner, with the assistance of a business partner, students will obtain a working knowledge of the logistical and sales challenges associated with International Trade.
MKT–477 International Marketing (3 credits)
Examines the impact of culture, economics and legal and regulatory influences on marketing strategy in more than one nation. Prerequisite: Marketing 325.
MKT–490 Marketing Research (3 credits)
Introduces applications,methods, techniques and functions of market research and information systems. Prerequisite: Marketing 325.
MKT–492 Strategic Marketing Management (3 credits)
Provides an examination of marketing strategy selection and implementation with a focus on decision making and problem solving. Prerequisite: Marketing 325; senior standing.