Veterans Affairs

1 of 1
ROTC Soldiers

The ROTC at UE

The Army Reserves Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) is available to UE students. ROTC provides hands-on leadership development in addition to regular college courses. Students are eligible for up to full-tuition, merit-based scholarships and other financial assistance through the US Army.

ROTC Scholarship Options

There are two paths to apply for ROTC scholarships at the University of Evansville, active duty scholarships and reserve component scholarships. The scholarship benefits are the same; however, the application process, award duration, and selectivity are different.

Active Duty Scholarships (starting as a college freshman, 4 year awards)

Scholarship benefits

  • Full tuition plus fees
  • $1200 a year for books
  • $300 to $500 monthly stipend

Active duty scholarships are the most competitive ROTC awards. Interested students apply during their senior year of high school via an on-line application whereby applicants are evaluated by a national review board. Each Battalion, or group of colleges, has a limited number of awards available. The University of Evansville is part of the Wabash Valley Battalion which includes the University of Southern Indiana, Indiana State University, DePauw University and Rose Hulman University.

Requirements to be considered for an active duty scholarship include:

  • U.S. Citizen
  • Age 17 before scholarship is effective
  • SAT taken by November of the year you apply with a minimum ACT 19 or Minimum SAT 920
  • Good high school grades
  • Participation in leadership, extra-curricular and athletic activities (or part-time job)
  • High school diploma or equivalent
  • Army approved major
  • Acceptance of commission as U.S. Army, Army Reserve or Army National Guard officer
  • Meet physical fitness standards (Males 18-21 yrs old - 43 push-ups, 53 sit-ups, 15:56 for 2 mile run; Females - 17 push-ups, 53 sit-ups, 18:54 for 2 mile run)
  • Pass an Army medical physical (at no fee to the student)
  • Generally in good health with no documented asthma pass the age of 12, no current or recent drug use, and no felonies, and no fines in excess of $250.00 (speeding or traffic tickets)
  • Recommendation by professor of Military Science

Obligation to the U.S. Army upon degree completion:

  • 8 years active duty or combination of active & reserves (i.e. 4 years active duty, plus 4 years reserves or National Guard)

How to apply:

Application requests can be made beginning February 1 of the junior year of high school and must be submitted by January 10 of the senior year. Applications submitted past this date will be considered but may not be as competitive for selection. For an application go to www.armyrotc.com or call 1-888-250-5277.


Reserve Component Scholarships (starting as a college sophomore, 3 or 2 year award)

UE alumnus, General Martin Umbarger, Adjutant General of Indiana Army & Air National Guard gathers with ROTC cadets and instructors for Homecoming.

Scholarship benefits

  • Full tuition plus fees or Room and Board
  • $1200 a year for books
  • $300 to $500 monthly stipend

Reserve components scholarships are awarded to qualified candidates. The scholarships can be awarded for two or three years starting the sophomore year. While awards do not begin in the freshman year, the reserve component scholarships allow students time to experience ROTC and determine if the program is right for them.

Requirements to be considered for a reserve component scholarship at UE include:

  • Admitted to the University of Evansville
  • U.S. Citizen
  • Age 17 before scholarship is effective
  • College cumulative GPA minimum 2.5
  • Participation in leadership, extra-curricular and athletic activities (or part-time job)
  • High school diploma or equivalent
  • Army approved major
  • Acceptance of commission as U.S. Army, Army Reserve or Army National Guard officer
  • Meet physical standards (Males 18-21 yrs old - 43 push-ups, 53 sit-ups, 15:56 for 2 mile run; Females - 17 push-ups, 53 sit-ups, 18:54 for 2 mile run)
  • Pass an Army medical physical (at no fee to the student)
  • Generally in good health with no documented asthma pass the age of 12, no current or recent drug use, and no felonies, and no fines in excess of $250.00 (speeding or traffic tickets)
  • Recommendation by professor of Military Science

Obligation to the U.S. Army upon degree completion:

  • 8 years in an active drilling status (i.e. National Guard or Army Reserves, 1 weekend per month and 2 weeks in the summer)

How to apply:

Please indicate your intent to apply for an ROTC scholarship as soon as possible by notifying CPT John Hubbard. Once admitted to the University of Evansville, please contact CPT John Hubbard at (812) 461-5303 or email at jhubbard1@usi.edu to schedule an interview, medical physical and physical fitness test. Awards are limited and will be given on a first-come-first-served basis.


ROTC Courses and Physical Training

ROTC cadets out for a run.

UE cadets meet with cadets from University of Southern Indiana to do weekly physical training (PT). PT sessions include cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, and muscular endurance training. PT sessions and courses may be held at USI and/or UE, dependent upon enrollment numbers. Courses are in the following sequence:

First Year:

MSL 101: Leadership and Personal Development
MSL 101 introduces cadets to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. Cadets learn how the personal development of life skills such as critical thinking, goal setting, time management, physical fitness, and stress management relate to leadership, officership, and the Army profession. The focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army leadership dimensions while gaining a big picture understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student.
MSL 102: Introduction to Tactical Leadership
MSL 102 overviews leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problem-solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback, and using effective writing skills. Cadets explore dimensions of leadership values, attributes, skills, and actions in the context of practical, hands-on, and interactive exercises. Continued emphasis is placed on recruitment and retention of cadets. Cadre role models and the building of stronger relationships among the cadets through common experience and practical interaction are critical aspects of the MSL 102 experience.

Second Year:

MSL 201: Innovative Team Leadership
MSL 201 explores the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and two historical leadership theories that form the basis of the Army leadership framework. Cadets practice aspects of personal motivation and team building in the context of planning, executing, and assessing team exercises and participating in leadership labs. Focus is on continued development of the knowledge of leadership values and attributes through an understanding of Army rank, structure, and duties and basic aspects of land navigation and squad tactics. Case studies provide tangible context for learning the Soldier's Creed and Warrior Ethos as they apply in the contemporary operating environment (COE).
MSL 202: Foundations of Tactical Leadership
MSL 202 examines the challenges of leading tactical teams in the COE. The course highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling, and operation orders. Further study of the theoretical basis of the Army leadership framework explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations. MSL 202 provides a smooth transition into MSL 301. Cadets develop greater self awareness as they assess their own leadership styles and practice communication and team building skills. COE case studies give insight into the importance and practice of teamwork and tactics in real world scenarios.

Third Year:

MSL 301: Adaptive Team Leadership
MSL 301 challenges cadets to study, practice, and evaluate adaptive leadership skills as they are presented with challenging scenarios related to squad tactical operations. Cadets receive systematic and specific feedback on their leadership attributes and actions. Based on such feedback, as well as their own self-evaluations, cadets continue to develop their leadership and critical thinking abilities. The focus is developing cadets' tactical leadership abilities to enable them to succeed at ROTC's summer Leadership Development and Assessment Course (LDAC).
MSL 302: Leadership under Fire
MSL 302 uses increasingly intense situational leadership challenges to build cadet awareness and skills in leading small units. Skills in decision-making, persuading and motivating team members when "under fire" are explored, evaluated, and developed. Aspects of military operations are reviewed as a means of preparing for the ROTC Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). Cadets are expected to apply basic principles of the Law of Land Warfare, Army training, and motivation to troop leading procedures. Emphasis is also placed on conducting military briefings and developing proficiency in Garrison operation orders. MSL 302 cadets are evaluated on what they know and do as leaders.

Fourth Year:

Overview of LDAC: Leader Development and Assessment Course
LDAC/Warrior Forge is the crucible of the Army ROTC Program. As such, Cadet Command must provide the best professional training and evaluation possible for all cadets. The primary focus at LDAC is to evaluate each cadet's officer potential in a collective environment. The secondary purpose of LDAC is to validate specific skills taught on campus and to impart selective individual and collective common skills. LDAC represents the only opportunity for this command to assemble cadets from disparate schools into an environment with common operational conditions.
MSL 401: Developing Adaptive Leaders
MSL 401 develops cadet proficiency in planning, executing, and assessing complex operations, functioning as a member of a staff, and providing performance feedback to subordinates. Cadets assess risk, make ethical decisions, and lead fellow ROTC cadets. Lessons on military justice and personnel processes prepare cadets to make the transition to Army officers. MSL IV cadets analyze, evaluate, and instruct cadets at lower levels. Both their classroom and battalion leadership experiences are designed to prepare MSL 401 cadets for their first unit of assignment. They identify responsibilities of key staff, coordinate staff roles, and use situational opportunities to teach, train, and develop subordinates.
MSL 402: Leadership in a Complex World
MSL 402 explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations in the COE. Cadets examine differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. They also explore aspects of interacting with nongovernmental organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support. The course places significant emphasis on preparing cadets for their first unit of assignment. It uses case studies, scenarios, and "What Now, Lieutenant?" exercises to prepare cadets to face the complex ethical and practical demands of leading as commissioned officers in the United States Army.

For More Information

Major Chris Dalrymple
Assistant Professor of Military Science
University of Evansville ROTC
812-461-5304
E-mail: christopher.m.dalrymple.mil@mail.mil

SFC Tim Olberding
Simultaneous Membership Program Coordinator
University of Evansville ROTC
812-589-2729
E-mail: timothy.w.olberding.mil@mail.mil

Cherie Leonhardt
Coordinator, Office of Veterans Affairs
University of Evansville Office of Veterans Affairs
800-423-8633, ext. 2141
812-488-2141
E-mail: CL29@evansville.edu


Additional Resources about ROTC and the Benefits it Provides